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The Pros and Cons of Buying a Stucco Home

Kelly Allen

After attending Georgia College and State University, Kelly Allen decided it was time to pursue a new challenge: the wild world of residential Real Es...

After attending Georgia College and State University, Kelly Allen decided it was time to pursue a new challenge: the wild world of residential Real Es...

Oct 1 3 minutes read

Stuck on questions about stucco? Allow me to share some answers. 

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Here in Metro Atlanta, stucco is quite the hot topic. This is likely why one of my clients, Elizabeth, recently asked me what issues can arise when this common construction material is used on homes.

Before we get into the answer, it’s good to note that there are two types of stucco: traditional hard-coat stucco and synthetic (or “EFIS”) hard-coat stucco. Traditional hard-coat stucco is made from cement, sand, lime, and water, and is put over a mesh to prevent cracking. This type of stucco has been used for generations all across the world. 

Synthetic stucco, which was first used in post-war Europe to patch holes in damaged homes, became popular in America in the 1970s, when the Green Movement began. Many don’t realize this, but because synthetic stucco is applied in layers, it is actually a more energy-efficient option than the traditional alternative. It is also better for insulation purposes, and is less prone to fade or yellow over time. 

An easy way to determine if stucco is traditional or synthetic is by knocking on it. If it makes a hollow sound, it’s synthetic. 

But let’s get back to our main topic: the issues that can arise with stucco. 

The first major drawback to synthetic stucco, specifically, is that it isn’t great for wet climates. It’s also less resistant to damage than certain other building materials. Traditional stucco, however, tends not to have either of these issues.

This does not mean that traditional stucco is without faults, though. For one, it can be quite expensive. 

Also, no stucco, regardless of type, should touch anything on or near the ground.

If you have any other questions, would like more information, or would like to learn how my team and I can help you meet your real estate goals, feel free to give us a call or send us an email. We look forward to hearing from you soon. 



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